Seasons of the Church Year

It’s been a while since posting anything here at wordpress.com.  It seems I just rediscovered it today. I forgot how beautiful the layout is at this site.  Thank you wordpress.  Thank you for being here.  Thank you for the beautiful themes you provide.  Thank you for my theme that I use here, i.e., Quentin.

I want to take a minute and talk about the Seasons of the Year. I’m talking about the seasons of the universal church. So this post is for anyone who wants to delve into and learn a little about the seasons and how to determine when each one begins and ends.

So the first thing I’m going to do is post an At a glance…for anyone to consider. At a glance…is an outline of the seasons of the year, in the order in which they occur from year to year. So here it is.


The Seasons of the Year

At a glance…
A. The Season of Advent…71.
B. Christmastide…72.
a. the season of Christmas…72. a)
b. the season of Epiphany…72. b)
C. Throughout the year I…77.
D. The Season of Septuagesima…73.
E. The Lenten Season…74.
a. the season of Lent…74. a)
b. Passiontide…74. b)
F. Paschaltide…76.
a. the Easter season…76. a)
b. Ascensiontide…76. b)
c. the octave of Pentecost…76. c)
G. Throughout the year II…77.


Do you see those numbers beside each season? Those numbers are the paragraph numbers found in the General Rubrics of 1960 (found online), and they are the same paragraphs found in my new 3 volume Roman Breviary.

Now, for anyone who wants to pray what is called the Extraordinary Form of the Divine Office, but is somewhat new to all of this, as I’m still somewhat new, the outline above may come in real handy.

When I started to read the General Rubrics in my breviary, I came to the section: The Seasons of the Year. But I didn’t understand it. So what I did was I reread it again and again, and thought about it some more and some more, and then finally decided to make the outline above: At a glance…

So, I think I’ve got the seasons of the year down pat…well, not really. But just so you, me, and others may benefit, I’m also going to include the paragraphs for each season. This should leave no rock uncovered, so to speak. So here is each paragraph that explains when each season begins and ends.

A. The Season of Advent

71. The season of holy Advent runs from 1st vespers of the First Sunday of  Advent to none of the vigil of Christmas inclusive.

B. Christmastide

72. Christmastide runs from 1st vespers of Christmas to January 13 inclusive.

Within this time are included:

a) the season of Christmas, which runs from 1st vespers of Christmas to none of January 5 inclusive.

b) the season of Epiphany, which runs from 1st vespers of the Epiphany of our Lord to January 13 inclusive.

C. Throughout the year I

77. The season “throughout the year” runs from January 14 to none of the Saturday before Septuagesima Sunday, and from 1st vespers of the feast of the Most Holy Trinity, that is, of the First Sunday after Pentecost, through none of the Saturday before the First Sunday of Advent.

Note: In paragraph 77 above, the rubrics for Throughout the Year I are highlighted in red and Throughout the Year II in black.

D. The Season of Septuagesima

73. The season of Septuagesima runs from 1st vespers of the Septuagesima Sunday through compline of Tuesday of Quinquagesima week.

E. The Lenten Season

74. The Lenten season runs from matins of Ash Wednesday up to but not including the Mass of the Easter vigil.

Within this time are included:

a) the season of Lent, which runs from matins of Ash Wednesday through none of the Saturday before the 1st Sunday of the Passion;

b) Passiontide, which runs from 1st vespers of the 1st Sunday of the Passion up to but not including the Mass of the Easter vigil.

F. Paschaltide

76. Paschaltide runs from the beginning of the Mass of the Easter vigil through none of Saturday within the octave of Pentecost.

Within this time are included:

a) the Easter season, which runs from the beginning of the Mass of the Easter vigil through none of the vigil of the Ascension of our Lord;

b) Ascensiontide, which runs from 1st Vespers of the Ascension of our Lord through none of the vigil of Pentecost;

c) the octave of Pentecost, which runs from the Mass of the vigil of Pentecost through none of the following Saturday.

G. Throughout the year II

77. The season “throughout the year” runs from January 14 to none of the Saturday before Septuagesima Sunday, and from 1st vespers of the feast of the Most Holy Trinity, that is, of the First Sunday after Pentecost, through none of the Saturday before the First Sunday of Advent.

Note: In paragraph 77 above, the rubrics for Throughout the Year I are highlighted in red and Throughout the Year II in black.


So there you have it. These paragraphs, which are taken from the General Rubrics of 1960, explains when each season begins and ends.

Hope this helps anyone interested in increasing their faith in God. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask. I may not know the answer right off the top of my head, but I’ll make every effort to get back with you. Thanks for reading.

One other thing. The note for paragraph 77 is not in the General Rubrics of 1960. It simply is a note (or better yet, a comment) I made to explain the two different periods that comprise “throughout the year”.

And one additional thing, too. The following is a quote from the Apostolic Letter given “moto proprio” by Pope Benedict XVI.


ON THE USE OF THE ROMAN LITURGY PRIOR TO THE REFORM OF 1970

§3 Ordained clerics may also use the Roman Breviary promulgated in 1962 by Blessed John XXIII.


And from the instruction on the application of Summorum Pontificum (from the Vatican website):

32. Art. 9 § 3 of the Motu Proprio Summorum Pontificum gives clerics the faculty to use the Breviarium Romanum in effect in 1962, which is to be prayed entirely and in the Latin.

Published on Mar 1, 2015 at 5:19 PM  Leave a Comment  

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